Tag Archive: music scene


You can listen to the show every Thursday

You can listen to the show every Thursday

We speak to Tommy Clark of radio show The Third Class Ticket, and ask his opinion on all things to do with unsigned music.

Can you tell us a bit about The Third Class Ticket?
The Third Class Ticket show is a weekly Internet based radio show on MESi Radio.  It is solely for the promotion of new and unsigned bands that probably don’t get much airplay anywhere else.  It came about as most music projects do as a hobby in my bedroom.  I messed around with mixtapes and wee half hour ‘radio shows’ then posting them to my facebook page.  The guys at MESi heard them and asked me on board when the station kicked off last year.  At the time the show was mostly a mod type show but as more unsigned bands sent through their stuff to me the ‘Ticket’ show was re-born.  Now each week the show plays in excess of 30 songs.

How would an artist go about submitting their music for your show?
Bands interested in joining the Ticket family can send their tracks to me at thirdclassticket@hotmail.co.uk.  Mp3 or WAV files are preferable.  Also they can reach me at www.facebook.com/thethirdclassticket or at www.mesiradio.com

Do you have any hot tips for us to check out?
Now isn’t that the million dollar question.  So far on the show I have been lucky enough to play some of the best music going on.  Bands I would suggest to go in the Glasgow area alone are Rank Berry, Soldier On, The Begbies, The Coffins, Cabey, Sonic Templars, Jim Dead, Craig Hughes, The Apparells, Stonehouse Violets, Enemies of the State, The Revolt, The Beat Movement, Button Up or any of the singer/songwriters on the ACRE records label.  From further afield listen out for The Found, The Panoramic, Electric Stars, French Boutik, The Arrivals, Echo Raptors, Pretty Cartel, The 45s, The Universal and The Lemontops (who are coming soon to Kilmarnock – don’t miss them). Apologies to the hundreds of other great bands who have featured on the show but I cant list you all.  All in all tune into the show because every week you could hear your new favourite band.

Unsigned artists played on the show

Unsigned artists played on the show

What do you think makes a radio show like The Third Class Ticket so important for unsigned music?
The Third Class Ticket show is sometimes the first time that some bands are heard on radio so it can be the spur to push harder.  I have found that as word spreads about  the show  more bands who are friends of bands played or have been on the same bill are contacting the show.  I look upon the show and the wider ‘ticket’ family as a community who spreads the word of what’s bubbling under what’s bubbling under the surface.  Also it gives bands in Ayrshire hear what’s going on in Newcastle or Portsmouth or Las Vegas.  They can get new ideas, new contacts and even more importantly opportunities to get opportunities to play with like minded bands from across the country.  The motto of the show is ‘WE ARE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER’ and if we all work together we become stronger.

What’s your opinion of the music scene as it is today?
The music scene is vibrant right now it’s just the audiences that need to get better.  And to be fair bands need to get a bit better too.  If you are first on the bill at a gig night stick around and support the other bands.  It could be you playing to the small crowds next. Rant Over.  Musically though there is a wealth of talent and innovation out there.  X Factor hasn’t ruined music it’s just made bands work harder which I don’t think is too bad a thing.  Please support live music because if we don’t it wont be there when we want it.

 You can listen to The Third Class Ticket show every Thursday on MESi Radio from 9pm.

One to Watch: Interzone

We Are The Interzone

We Are The Interzone

Glasgow’s answer to Arctic Monkeys, Interzone are a hard rock band who’s popularity has sky-rocketed since they formed in the summer of 2012.

I’ve seen them live a fair amount of times, and they’re one of the most exciting new bands to emerge from the local scene. Always attracting a big crowd at every gig they play, they easily capture the attention of everyone in the venue, and for good reason.

For a fairly young band, they have an incredible stage presence, in particular frontman Oli Sibley. Not only has he got a great voice but an onstage energy and presence most frontmen could only dream of.

The songs are fantastic too. Left Alone In The Dark has a brilliant riff running through it, equipped with a huge chorus and an epic solo. Higher is a personal favourite for me; great bassline, loud guitars, pounding drums and a chorus you can’t help sing along to as Oli tells you “We’re gonna go downtown and get a little bit higher”.

All in all, Interzone are brilliant and if you have the chance, definitely check them out. One band I’m tipping for the top.

Band Advice – Playing a Gig

Biffy Clyro at the SECC, 2009Here’s the next installment of the Band Advice section; playing a gig. On the day of the gig it’s best to arrive early – the organiser will probably ask you to do this anyway. This is to load-in, which means to bring in all your gear and set up the backline. If you arrive at the time asked, it’s more likely that you will get a chance to soundcheck too.

Before you head to the venue, make sure you have all the equipment you need. For example, if you’re a guitarist, you’ll need a lead, a spare lead if that one breaks, a tuner, plectrums, and ofcourse, your guitar. It’s a good idea to bring spare strings as well – be prepared for any eventuality!

Most venues will have enough backline, but if you’re a drummer, bring your cymbals, snare, and a bass pedal if needed. These are the breakables; other drummers playing wouldn’t be too happy about you using their cymbals or snare because, as you’ve probably guessed, they’re easily damaged.

Be nice to the sound engineer. If you’re acting like an idiot, or are under the impression that you’re an awesome rockstar who can shout orders at them and everyone else, be warned. The sound guy is completely in charge of the levels and how you sound on stage, so if you give them rubbish, they can make you sound rubbish.

A good thing about playing live is the contacts your able to make, whether it be with other bands, or with the promoters. For example, at one of the gig’s my band played, we made friends with a fantastic guy from a band called The Puzzlers, and he is now mixing some of our songs.

Before you go on stage, tune your guitar, and then tune it again. During one of the gigs I’ve played, I didn’t tune up correctly, and it sounded pretty bad. If you have to tune whilst on stage, try to use a plug-in tuner, and whatever you do, don’t tune with your amp on. It’s really unprofessional if the audience can hear you trying to tune up to a high E.

So, next is the actual performance. If you make a mistake, just carry on. Chances are no one has noticed, and mistakes happen. You will have a few bad gigs, it’s inevitable, but the majority of the gigs you play will go well, and the best thing is that you learn from the mistakes you do make. Personally, I’ve made a countless amount of mistakes, but I kept going. The most important thing is to enjoy yourself on stage, and have a great time!